TEDTalks Live: The Education Revolution

Last night the Empire State Building was red in honor of the first sessions of TEDTalks Live on Broadway.

I was sitting in the balcony in the Town Hall theatre, surrounded by teachers, students, and TED staff who were there to celebrate some of the brave thinkers taking on the “Education Revolution” head on. Speakers included principal Nadia Lopez, who became an important figure in education reform when one of her students was profiled by Humans of New York and the student cited his high school principal as the most influential person in his life, Former White House Chef and food policy advisor Sam Kass, and Andrew Mangino from The Future Project.

Perhaps my favorite moment from the evening was when principal Lopez was introduced by host Baratunde Thurston and everyone around me stood up and cheered. It was the warmth of reception that celebrities usually receive… and it was amazing to be part of a community that is this excited about a principal committed to making change in the lives of her students. She spoke without jargon or false promises, it was purely focused on her students and the community she was building in Brownsville. How she showed up for them every day, and therefore expected them to do the same.

I think the commitment the TEDTalks Live team made to including students and teachers at this event was what helped create such a magical experience for the rest of the audience. My section of the audience positively glowed with warmth for many of the figures on the stage last night, and their love and enthusiasm was infectious.

I left optimistic for the future of education reform… and seeking new places to be useful in my own corner of the world.

Hacker Labs: Where do new communities, cities, and civilizations grow?

Mexico City, Washington DC, Tunis, New York City.

Also, what is TEDx?

A number of governments have jumped on the “let’s building a start up/hacker lab space to tackle some of our internal and external issues!” bandwagon, with varying degrees of success. Perhaps, one of the best documented in American media right now is the White House’s team that fixed the Health Care Website and the group tasked with “hacking” other aspects of government. Some of these projects are much newer and need time to pick the issues they want to tackle, find staff with the right vision for these projects, and get settled into the ecosystem.

This post is not about evaluating how well this program runs, rather, I am providing a basic overview of some of the different types of projects and systems that I have explored… and some praise for the “imagined community” (Benedict Anderson) that the TEDx program has created. 

Mexico City — Laboratorio para la Ciudad

 The Lab was designed and is currently run by a friend/mentor, Gabriella Gomez-Mont, who I met for the first time very whimsically in a favorite coffee shop at Yale while she was there as a Yale World Fellow. [She saw my messenger back from TEDx Summit and we talked about it… quickly realizing we had been looking for each other and hoping to connect on campus at some point.]

The lab started as a project out of the Mayor of Mexico City’s office in 2013. Described as a “think tank and experimental space” Gabriella was asked to build this project through an invitation she received by the (then) newly elected mayor Miguel Angel Mancera. Some of the themes the lab has tackled include “Open Cities,” “Creative Urban Spaces,” and “Civic Innovation.” They host collaborative hacking events in their spaces, and carefully document their experiments and results in beautiful ways as they go.

Every aspect of the lab is an adventure. They tackle issues ranging from making city spaces in the congested and intimidatingly massive Mexico City into smaller, approachable community spaces, the best ways to bring public art to the city, and how to teach marketable skills to a huge population in efficient and effective ways. The lab is constantly coming up with new things that it can do to improve the experience of Mexico City.

My own experiences with the group has been super positive, because Gabriella is brave and creative in the issues she wants to think about. Even when I mentioned wanting to map the informal economic networks of Mexico City… she didn’t flinch. Instead, opening the conversation with “sounds interesting, where would we start?”

Tunis — Cogite

I’m visiting Cogite this week during my trip to Tunisia (writing from one of their coworking spaces right now, in fact!) and getting to see all of the great work that Houssem and Fatene do here.

The coworking space turned skillshare lab opened the doors to its first coworking space in 2013 and has grown dramatically since then, with soon to be five coworking spaces in Tunis. Houssem Aoudi is the CEO of Cogite and the longtime curator/organizer for TEDxCarthage. Under his leadership, Cogite has grown into an amazing business space for the vibrant community that he and Fatene have built and supported with their team.

During some of their skillshare evenings, Cogite will invite local CEOs to talk about their experience building businesses in Tunisia. On Tuesday, for example, Cogite hosted Tarek Lassadi of Traveltodo, a major online tourism company for Tunisia. Lassadi answered questions from a room packed full of young entrepreneurs working in a variety of cool industries.

Cogite_Entrepreneur Discussion
Photo Credit: Houssem Aoudi (Cogite, CEO)

It was a cool experience — Lassadi was very warm and relaxed. Not at all like some of the NYC meet ups I’ve been to, where it is sometimes very difficult to connect to the speaker or the formality of the event makes the experience feel, all together, more “high pressure” to network. This was about similarly creative and business minded individuals meeting, connecting and sharing their experiences to help others grow in their own work.

Fatene (COO of Cogite) is a Branding and Strategy Whiz herself — so she has presented some tips at a skillshare event at Cogite before too.

The community that they’ve built here is so vibrant and full of great ideas, it’s not hard to imagine that soon their website will host a skillshare blog similar to the First Round Review. I’ve been here for only a little over 24 hours and already plotted out a slew of fascinating future research projects with some of the people in Cogite (from concepts to explore to the funding…).

New York City — Integrated Digital Media Lab at NYU Poly 

I’ve been able to see and an event highlighting some of the projects coming out of NYU Poly’s Integrated Digital Media and Ability Labs recently, and it’s pretty great stuff.

NYU Poly has a great coworking/classroom space in downtown Brooklyn, where students are encouraged by professors like R. Luke DuBois to build things that I could really only imagine coming to life. His classes and projects reflect the same interdisciplinary approach that he takes with his own work: he has completed advanced degrees in Music Composition (He did his masters and Doctor of Musical Arts at Columbia), he is a developer and product manager at software development firm Cycling ’74, and he is a visual artist working in a variety of mediums with work at the BitForms gallery).

While opening a box of cheap electronic parts and mini-LED screens with what could only be described as glee, he described some of the cool projects students at NYU Poly take on in the lab. Professor DuBois told me once, “I dropped these tools on my desk and then told my students, ‘here are some tools. I am going to buy a sandwich. Bug my office by the time I get back.'”

The center supports programs like the ConnectAbility challenge, which rewarded programers and product designers who were thinking about creative ways to improve lives of individuals with disabilities. Kinetic Mouse, the Grand Prize Winner, for example, is a software program that provides hands free access to PCs using video camera that detect changes in facial expression.

And… TEDx?

The TEDx platform has grown dramatically since it started 5 years ago. Some of the early organizers have become local celebrities and celebrated figures in the wider “ideas economy.” My hosts in Tunisia this week are among these amazing people [Houssem and Fatene are enormously talented and creative individuals with beautiful hopes for the future].

Beyond ideas sharing, TEDx has evolved into an “imagined community,” for me. It means that I always have something to talk about with other organizers and I frequently end up visiting/collaborating with them on projects. In fact, two long time organizers did the Mongol Rally to prove how strong this community is.

I met a number of other organizers while I was working on TEDxYale. I was with a few of them at TEDActive in 2012, right after our first TEDxYale event: A Twist of Fate, and then TEDGlobal in 2013, after we had successfully transitioned into a second team and hosted a second major event (Solve for Y). My role in TEDxYale since has been as an advisor, but I am still friends with many of the organizers running awesome events around the world.

 

TEDxYale

The best part of this community? Everyone asks about your projects and follows up with “sounds awesome. How can I help?” Even now, while I am in Tunis and explain what I study and like to think about, I receive a flood of stories and examples to help support my research and case studies. It’s wonderful.

TEDx has become a platform for collaboration on a local level — I love going to events in new cities and communities and seeing local heroes pull back the curtain on their projects and dig into the gritty pieces of their process and the ideas they have for the futures. It might not take place on the same massive scale that some of the TED speakers do, but many of the speakers DO talk about what it takes to “get the job done” here. Now. It’s about being present and growing together for many of these communities. The chance to celebrate a variety of locally grown concepts builds hope. I really love that.

I learn from TEDx organizers all the time. Steve Garguilo at Johnson and Johnson runs an amazing program, including TEDxJNJ, that supports creativity and risk taking within a traditionally corporate setting. He proves, regularly, that it is possible to “hack” the corporate space and encourage employees to leave their traditional roles within the company to develop amazing interdisciplinary work.

TEDx in itself begins to feel like a global ideas incubator… perfect for researchers like me who need to tap into local communities quickly to get a better sense of the questions I should be asking. Often when I find myself needing to think through a job transition, new research proposal, or am having trouble defining my questions, will turn to some of my friends in the TEDx community and pitch them concepts. My friends are extremely responsive and the feedback I get is always useful (…how often can we say that about any of our colleagues?).

I’ve collaborated on research projects ranging from “Hacking Sex-Ed” to “Mapping the Labor Structure of Baltimore” with friends from the TEDx world. And when I go abroad to do research… it’s like I’m never alone. There is usually a TEDx group I can connect with for coffee and tips about exploring the city.

I guess this all means we have a lot of work to do… but that doesn’t strike me as a bad thing. I can’t wait to see what happens next with all of these creative instigators.

Jackson Heights: Raw Profile

An intro…

I am working on a few interesting projects right now, but I wanted to get through a sort of raw profile/information dump of my first day time hike/fact finding trip for a project I’m on in Queens. We spent a few days planning out what we hoped to do here and searching for books on the history of the area. Besides food books and “Eat Your Way Through Queens: The Guidebook,” the Strand carries very little on the history of Queens. We ordered a book from their warehouse on Jackson Heights (our subject for today) and found a book capturing Queens through photographs and narratives from the 1930s. We have an interesting narrative to build from here… This first piece is my raw impression of the area we explored and what stayed with me. I want to allow you to see how this evolves over time, because its a fascinating place and project.

Now we find ourselves on set in… three, two, one:

In what looks like it will be a long term project, I spent this morning walking through Jackson Heights getting to know the area. This wasn’t my first time visiting, but it was my first time seeing it during the day. My first trip was as a member of a midnight tour group — we walked up Roosevelt avenue taking in the busy scene of the street, the 7 train roaring overhead and the community gathering and passing time together on the sidewalk.

Background!

I am writing about informal economic communities, and this was the beginning of a very interesting trip. It felt totally different — far few consumer directed informal businesses on the sidewalks and off the side streets. Instead, it was a lot of people commuting to and from work, passing through with their children or grandchildren, older people gathering for lunch and enjoying the beautiful summer weather… all of this.

Walk with me:

The layout of this particular part of the city was fun. We started on the edges of Jackson Heights, on the part of Roosevelt where there is still a strong Indian population. The area is very orderly and full of wonderful bright colors, sari stores, grocery stores with specialty spices, Ghee and Naan, costume golden jewelry and other odds and ends. Scattered between some of these stores, we saw the occasional Chinese owning, advertising legal services and medical services, among other things.

We had the repair-all tech stores, offering to “unlock” your cellphones [this is a service directed, typically, at phones that are either stolen and resold and therefore need to have the previous user’s information wiped off them or it allows you to remove the factory settings on iphones to use them in ways the initial software would not let you. It made me smile because it reminded me of some of the underground economic activities of college campuses — I definitely knew people who would “jailbreak” iphones for other students and get paid for the service. Usually it was for more of the techy crowd that wanted to write code for their phones and build apps. Some of them were the variety of hackers who enjoy breaking everything into little pieces to examine all of it while they put it back together. Sort of like design thinking… but through someone else’s preexisting model.

The series of streets after the low 80s is predominantly Colombia and Ecuadorian. Slightly further up, we found a lot of Mexicans. They helped us navigate this transition and understand where we were through the particular branding mechanisms that they offered. The stores owned by Ecuadorians had the country’s flag somewhere in the images on the front or inside of their stores. Colombian stores followed similar branding schemes — both groups sometimes included some version of word play about the products this business offered and country of origin of its owners.

Perhaps my favorite moment of “I really am in Queens and this is the coolest immigrant community in New York” happened when I was wandering around the Indian mega-grocery store (Patel Brothers) and found Northern and Southern Indians working there next to a Mexican man who was rearranging different types of amazing curry powders in 3lb bags, a Puerto Rican family was going through the MASSIVE bags of rice deciding what they wanted to purchase, and a few other Latin Americans scattered between enormous glass jars of Ghee, an aisle of Goya offerings and the frozen Indian dinners section. I found the aisle with Naan and Paratha, which, of course, smelled wonderful. And… it was quiet. There was space between aisles for me to walk comfortably without being afraid I might bump into someone coming around a corner or end up juggling and dropping things I was carrying. What a special place to find in this city!

We did spot a few cool examples of informal business.

I found a group that sells “herbal remedies” made in-house for everything ranging from immediately good luck, love potions, potions to help exercise spirits and hexes, to connect with the dead… you name it!  They managed to create their own products, sell products that were clearly manufactured somewhere (aerosol cans… of love or retirement potions????) and they offered “spiritual consulting services.” We did not exactly figure out what the last one was from this particular trip.

We saw computer classes, offering basic computer skills at $2/hour. We also noted a number of other medical offerings, many of which offered services like dentistry, massages, and basic medical care within their own homes. I found a “freelance” tow truck operator who also offered general maintenance/repair services. We spotted a few “cars for sale by owner,” and independent video/production design for people who “had something to say and wanted help shaping it.”

There were also a number of people advertising with sandwich boards for recruiters. This photo is one of the offerings with full transparency in the rates they were offering to potential workers. The list includes help in kitchens, cleaners, Deli men and Pizza men. The highest paying offer was for a pizza guy at $700. They also hire for “factory” though we did not end up getting an answer on which factory/where and that position offered the lowest pay of the group of offerings. We noted one woman had at least 2 offices on Roosevelt Avenue not too far apart down the same street. I was given a card for her office by someone handing them out on the street.

Hiring rates, Jackson Heights
Hiring rates, Jackson Heights

The neighborhood is a different creature during this “shift.” People were working in the stores and advertising their services in the streets. There was only one particular street that was walked down where the hawkers shouted about their wares offering us passage into their stores. This seems to happen less than I would expect in Jackson Heights, given the number of businesses competing very closely together.

It feels totally different after 8pm, when many more vendors come back to the neighborhood and sell food along Roosevelt Avenue. The vendors are completely unfazed while the trains roar overhead, rattling everything nearby. The streets are full of families and workers sitting down along window ledges eating their take out. It’s beautiful and smells completely divine.  But that is a story that will have to wait for another day!